Conferences

NordAN Conference 2016 – Oslo, Norway

AGENDA (with available MATERIALS)

Saturday, October 15

10.00
Welcome. Professor 
Peter Allebeck, NordAN president

Pål Isdahl Solberg, University College of Southeast Norway, Participation Agency
Keynote speech


11.00
Seminar/plenary 1
FINDINGS FROM ESPAD AND HBSC
Torbjørn Torsheim, University of Bergen (Psychometrics, Quantitative Psychology, Community Psychology). Norway HBSC team. Findings from the HBSC study
Håkan Leifman, director of CAN (Sweden), Member of the ESPAD Steering Committee – Finding from the ESPAD study
DISCUSSION

13.30
Seminar/plenary 2
REASONS AND DRIVERS
Moderated discussion. Moderator: 
Cees Goos (Netherlands)
Willy Pedersen, professor of Sociology at Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo
Maj-Inger Klingvall, President of KSAN, Sweden.
Hakan Fransson, Öckerö method, Sweden.
Maria Pedersen. RN. MPH. Ph.d.-student from Denmark. Presentation
Nijole Goštautaitė Midttun
, psychiatrist and director of the nonprofit organization “Mental health initiative”, Lithuania.

15.30-17.00 WORKSHOPS
1) Womens section – 
10 years of womens work in the NordAN networkLeena Harake
Sigríður Björnsdóttir –
Prevention, awareness and education
2) UNGASS and new psychoactives – Stig Erik Sørheim

Sunday, October 16

9.00
Seminar/plenary 3
YOUTH PERSPECTIVE ON THE ISSUE
Reinforcing the trend. Kjetil Vesteraas, Executive Director, Juvente (Norway)
What young people need today. Gaute Brækken, Advisor, Prevention, Blue Cross Norway
Panel discussion: Following or leading the young? How should NGOs, government agencies and others relate to trends in youth substance use?
Moderator: Anne Babb, General Secretary, International Blue Cross.

11.00
Seminar/plenary 4
IMPLICATIONS TO ALCOHOL POLICY in the future
Birgitta Ander, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden – Focus on parents
Adolescent binge drinkers seem to have moved away from street and other outdoor drinking arenas to home environments, meaning that professional youth workers and police cannot enter party arenas and the only adults who can do so are the parents. This has implications for preventive alcohol strategies and outreach social work.
Patrick Lie Andersen, NOVA Norwegian Social Research at the Oslo and Akershus University College – Drinking and health/wealth inequalities in Oslo
Young people from disadvantaged families in the capital of Norway have poorer mental health than others. They also have lower educational ambitions, exercise less, participate less in organised leisure activities, and are more often bullied.
Catrine Torbjørnsen Halås, Associate Professor at Nord University The Centre for Practical Knowledge – Mind the Gap – Youth At Risk
Different support services in Norway operate side by side, but lack of communication prevents youth from getting the help they need.

12.30
Conclusion.
Peter Allebeck, president of NordAN

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