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SWEDEN: Fewer people find it inappropriate to drink alcohol with children

For ten years, IQ has, annually, mapped the Swedes’ attitudes to alcohol and today this year’s survey, IQ’s Alcohol Index is presented. At the overall level, there does not appear to be any significant change in attitudes; attitudes change slowly and over a long period. However, in some areas, attitude shifts have occurred during these ten years, Karin Hagman, the CEO of IQ, writes in Aftonbladet.

“Among other things, we Swedes have changed our attitude to become drunk when children are involved and to invite young people under 18 to drink. The alcohol index shows that there are fewer of us who think it is entirely wrong to get drunk when children are present,” Hagman writes.

The proportion who feel that it is entirely wrong to get drunk when children are involved has decreased from 61 per cent in 2010 to 51 per cent in 2019. However, over time, the proportion who think it is OK is still around 4 per cent.

This year’s findings show apparent differences between women and men. Women are more restrained when it comes to being drunk when children are present, 59 per cent think it is entirely wrong, compared to men, where only 43 per cent think it is entirely wrong.

“As an adult, you should remember that children, even with small amounts of alcohol, notice that you are changing. It does not have to be loud or noisy, but it can be enough to get jittery or less attentive to the children. For children, it is not very easy when things happen that they do not understand.”

The survey also shows that fewer people refuse to invite young people under 18 in their own family to drink alcohol. In 2010, 56 per cent felt it was utterly wrong to invite minors in their own family to drink. In 2019, that figure dropped to 38 per cent. At the same time, the group who think it is right has increased from 11 to 16 per cent during the same period.